The Journey Here

Mayra Omar

Tatiana and I made this photo of Omar and Mayra at Crest Hollow Country Club in three minutes, but it took us four days to get there. Story below if interested … the photo geeks can just know that this was a 45mm f/2.8.

Clients often ask me what happens if I get sick? It’s a good question … there are no sick days here, and the people that hire us want our unique vision expressed to the best of our abilities. So, when we get sick, we make sure we have a back-up plan, but we also treat getting better quickly like it’s our actual and only job.

I try to be paranoid so my couples don’t have to be, and this week, all of our paranoid planning for incapacitating illness came into play. Both Tatiana and I were struck with the worst flu we’ve had in decades on Sunday, and upon the first sign of sickness the only thing I could think of was a countdown clock to Thursday’s wedding. We had to be better for it, and we did everything possible.

Most of you, statistically, know me as something other than your own wedding photographer — as a business and brand, we are any things. We teach, we share stories, we lecture, we work on independent projects … but our core work is simply showing up at weddings and doing the best we can, and that always wins out. We had so many plans for this workweek — I was finishing a project I’ve been working on for a year and a half. Delayed. We were in initial planning for our next workshop. Pushed back. I’m making the biggest changes to my business since 2007. Next week. And, one of these days, we’re planning our own wedding. Not now. It’s October, so the government wants reams of paperwork from my business — sorry for the tight deadline next week, accountants. Sadly, even our production deadlines had to be walked back a week, given that I didn’t have enough energy to do things like read a book or type on a keyboard. But every moment we knew we had to be our best selves for Thursday morning.

So we rested like it was our job. That meant getting a hotel room instead of making the normally easy trip back from Long Island. That meant leaving our comfy couch visiting first a clinic and then a hospital not due to emergency but just because I wasn’t getting my strength back fast enough. It meant some very healthy, but very disgusting water-and-greens-based nourishment drinks.

And it worked. We went from barely able to lift our head to being able to gracefully put in 11 hours of physical labor and come out smiling. Part of that is due to how awesome Omar and Mayra are, but it’s also that there is no seemly paranoid scenario that our couples can envision that have not already pored over long ago. We also had backup plans in case our work couldn’t get us well in time, but we are thrilled that our 800+ combined weddings have continued their flawless “bright and shiny attendance” streak.

Now, of course, we face a one-day workweek, and one peppered with meetings. In the fall, that means a staggering amount of deadlines and a to-do list so complicated that managing it is a to-do item in and of itself, but I’m glad we’re facing it together.

Renaissance Westchester Wedding — Ilana and Grant

There is something extra-awesome about shooting multiple weddings for the same family. Ilana’s wedding was the 2nd of the three sisters’ whose wedding I’ve shot, and it adds so much depth to see so many of the same people celebrating a new day, deja vu and nostalgia providing a perfect foil to the novelty of a new celebration. The Renaissance Westchester was a great location, combining beautiful locations with the logistical simplicity that makes my paranoid problem-solving heart sing. Steps to a beautiful pastoral path without dying of the summer humidity! A short walk to a quaint cottage where Ilana and Grant’s friends and family tore up the dance floor. It was one of those weddings where I only realize how long I’ve been smiling when I feel the strange ache in my cheeks. Thank you to Matias Gonzales for flying up from Chile and shooting his talented heart out with me.


Playing with Fire (Fiddler’s Elbow Wedding)

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Just when I think after 500ish weddings I’ve run into all of the challenges out there, life shows me how wrong I am … and I’m thankful for it. Without challenge, growth is slow and meandering.

On Friday morning, Tatiana and I got an e-mail from Kristin asking if we could do a long-exposure shot with shooting sparks. There were just a couple challenges 1) We had never taken this kind of photo before. 2) The wedding was also on Friday, and we were packing to leave.

Generally, photography tricks are modifications and extensions of existing techniques. I never would have thought up the so-called “Brenizer method” if I hadn’t already been experienced in regular panoramas, and while we’d never lit anything on fire and violently swung it around for a wedding photo, I was experienced enough in the other basic skills of night-time long exposures — such as exposing and composing a photo without being able to see anything that you’re doing — that we said we’d give it a try.

When pushing the envelope at a wedding, it is absolutely vital to manage expectations. I often ask couples if they want to take a given amount of time for something that might be awesome, or might be absolutely terrible. In the rare situation that we’re trying a new technique on the wedding day, we made absolutely clear that the result might be no photo at all, especially given that by doing this during the time of the reception we had time for only one frame.

That’s right — this photo is not only the very first time I’ve tried this technique but also, as of this writing, the last. Treading new ground on a tight time frame could only have been achieved with the capable help of Tatiana, who talked them through the posing and lit them with flash.

Important note: while I wasn’t sure whether we’d get a photo, I did make *really* sure that at least we wouldn’t set anything or anyone on fire. The bridge wasn’t just a pretty bit of symmetry for the photo — it also made sure we were surrounded by steel, concrete, and water. I was also farther away than it may look, though there is no such thing as too paranoid, especially when around highly inflammable things like lace (which we weren’t) or hair-sprayed hair (which distance and angle of velocity made exceedingly unlikely to get hit, but anything is possible, hence eager, informed consent from bride and nearby water).

Thank you Michael and Kristin for encouraging us toward creative and literal sparks.

Camera: Nikon D810
Lens: Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 II

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Wedding: Elyse and Anthony

I noticed early in my wedding photography career that when you asked a couple to talk about themselves, they would talk about their work, their interests, their hobbies … unless they were from Brooklyn. Those people would talk about Brooklyn. Despite any protestations, I have fully become one of those people. Tatiana and I have fallen in love with it, and made ourselves a blazing beacon of happiness that emanates out from our apartment. So you can imagine how excited we get when a beautiful, elegant, crazy wedding lands itself right at our doorstop, especially at a venue like the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens at the Palm House. Coincidentally, both Tatiana and I shot our first for-hire weddings at the gardens (I’d shot one before as part of a documentary), so it’s always a sort of homecoming for us both.

And what an amazing homecoming Elyse and Anthony’s wedding was. I could have filled an entire album with nothing but people bowled over in full-throated laughter, a reflection on the raucous fun. But the Gardens immediately bring to mind an incredible beauty, and they had a strong sense of exactly how to achieve that vision. After the ceremony we left the helpful staff behind in a madcap dash from one beautiful place to the other, zipping through portraits and back just in time to join the mariachi band serenading the cocktail hour. The gorgeous outdoor ceremony was conducted by Anthony’s father, a well-known judge who relished the opportunity, and the whole day.

With days like this it’s a pleasure just to be there, let alone have an opportunity to tell a great story. And as always it is an extra pleasure to document it along with Tatiana.


Newport, RI wedding at the Rosecliff Mansion: Nicole and Emilie

Nicole and Emilie’s Rosecliff Mansion wedding celebrated Independence Day on many levels — there were countless couture nods, from the red, white and blue clothes they wore to the oh-so-Northeastern rehearsal dinner at Kempenaar’s Clambake Club to the custom color worn by their Instagram-famous dog, Charlie. There were all the trappings of a Newport summer weekend, from casual fun over seafood and fireworks, to impossibly ornate settings like the Rosecliff and The Elms. But it was given a deeper, sweeter meaning when, shortly before the wedding day, the Supreme Court invalidated any laws keeping same-sex couples from marrying in any of the United States

When I started shooting weddings, only one state allowed same-sex couples to marry, and though it was right next door, it wasn’t recognized in Rhode Island until 2013. So not only could Nicole and Emilie show what a smart, driven, devoted couple they are, this can be recognized in every inch of their country. It was a good reason to wave the flag even harder that day.

But there’s a lot more to them, and to the unbelievably gorgeous wedding. They drip intelligence; you feel a bit smarter being near them. They’re the sort of people who use “alacrity” in common conversation, but also the sort to turn into emotive puddles when their dog is nearby. It was such a great feeling to share this day with them, and to share the coverage with my own love, Tatiana Breslow. I’m smiling just looking at these photos again, so I’m going to get out of the way and share them:



Alger House Wedding: Sabrina and Kumar

When Sabrina and Kumar decided to add 1920s’ vintage elements to their Alger House wedding, they really went for it — Sabrina taught 20 or so of her closest friends how to dance the Charleston. From the couple to the guests to the venue, the wedding dripped with style. But the close connections between the guests made it something more … unfortunately Kumar’s parents were blocked by paperwork from entering the country for the wedding, so Sabrina’s family stepped in, showing that although Kumar was only legally entering the family that day, they’d already long considered him a part of it. The relatively small size allowed a casual charm, including a meandering walk from the ceremony to the reception, enjoying the late April sun in Washington Square Park.

Of course, they knew the weather would probably be perfect, because one of the many factors they considered when planning their wedding was this exchange from “Miss Congeniality.”

“Miss Rhode Island, please describe your idea of a perfect date.”
That’s a tough one. I’d have to say April 25th. Because it’s not too hot, not too cold, all you need is a light jacket.”

Thanks to Jashim Jalal for his capable help on this great day.


A New Day

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Yesterday I started my first-ever 365 project. The season really went into full, non-stop-work mode last week, so this isn’t the best time for some deep, time-consuming personal project, so I’m keeping it vague: I will post a photo online every day over the next year. Some of them will be here, some on the countless different social media profiles photographers tend to collect along the way, but all will be collected on my business Facebook page.

I haven’t done a preponderance of personal work over the past six years not only because I’m shooting for work all the time, but because that work is so personal. A friend of mine said years ago: “I love weddings because the kinds of photos I’d want to take for free happen there, but I also get paid for it.” Weddings very quickly allow me to get to the stuff that matters in people … the emotion, the connections, the history. It might take days or weeks for people to become comfortable with a photographer around if you’re a long-form documentarian, but on wedding days it’s so natural for you to be there, and people have so many other things to think about, that you can get into the varied, real emotional life of people really quickly.

And it also allows me to play visually in so many different ways, because your only real instruction is “here’s the time you have, let’s see what you can do.” Shooting portraits with a wide-angle lens is general rule-breaking. Shooting with a 12mm lens is general insanity. Shooting from a lower angle with … well, you get the picture. The reasons for this is that it takes all sorts of tricks and learned skills to keep this sort of shot flattering, but it can be done. And it opens up the door to creating images that look completely different than the actual scene. Here all we had was about three minutes, a parking lot filled with cars, and rapidly oncoming rain. The lens stretches the venue behind them and the tree above them into looking like they’re on the same plane; the addition of light transforms them from three-dimensional objects to shapes.

I get to play, to try things that, by the rule book, are completely crazy, and then within minutes share in the chaotic emotional energy of a wedding celebration? Most of my job is personal work.

Also, because of the in-season, mid-week timing, there are still some seats open for my May 28 and 29 workshop here in Brooklyn. I will teach all of the tricks to make images like this work and many more, and we will also take you through getting, working with, and maintaining clients. We’ve gotten a flood of people saying that the dates couldn’t work for them, so similar to some of the favorite workshops I’ve done we’re going to allow signing up for just one day: May 28, the shooting-heavy day that runs from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., with breaks for lunch and dinner, will be $650. May 29, featuring portfolio review, all aspects of getting and pleasing clients, and running a long-term wedding photography business that sustains you financially and emotionally, will be $450 for 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Both days (which is recommended) is $1,000.

Vintage engagement shoot at June Wine Bar: Michelle and Matthew

There’s vintage, and then there’s Michelle and Matthew. A lot of people dress up in vintage clothing for shoots, simply because it’s fun and looks great. But when Michelle met Matthew, she was impressed by how he looked in the 1920s strongman-style swimsuit he was wearing. She runs a blog called My Vintage Love, so a good part of their central identity looks back about 100 years.

So when Tatiana Breslow and I thought through their engagement shoot for them, we centered around some bars with beautiful interior woodwork to play off their look. The Campbell Apartments are in Grand Central, so they have to be very careful about how much photography they let in — even with prior approval, we were allowed to shoot with our dSLRs for exactly 90 seconds. One of the photos below was taken with an iPhone 6+, and I wasn’t doing it just to be showy — it was all we were allowed to use!

In contrast, June Wine bar in my studio’s Brooklyn neighborhood was so nice and amazingly accommodating that it almost freaked us out. “Why are you so nice? You know this is New York, right?”

Advantage, Brooklyn.

It is such a great thrill to work alongside Tatiana, and to see how our businesses and lives will improve as we merge in the coming year, and the thrill doubles when we work with a great couple. This shouldn’t be the last you see of Michelle and Matthew.

Next Level Workshop: May 28 and 29 in Brooklyn

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It’s been more than two years since I’ve hosted a workshop in the U.S., but we’re back! After a series of workshops around the world, and more than 100 weddings later, we’ve refined our teaching experience and are launching the Next Level Workshops. Find out more at!

Also, Tara Atkinson has a well-written and thorough write-up of my last workshop in Dubai, complete with behind-the-scenes images. See that here.

Review: Adobe Lightroom CC

463268 adobe lightroomIf you’re reading this, then I am already de… no, wait, I’m still getting a hang of these scheduled posts. If you’re reading this, then Adobe has released Lightroom CC, the latest in what has become the massively dominant industry standard of professional RAW processing and photo organizing. I was honored to be selected as a member of Adobe’s beta-testing team, and I can say that I have been loving every moment of testing a pretty solid product, and that I haven’t gone back to Lightroom 5 for months.

Lightroom CC has several major new features and enhancements, the most obvious being in-application panorama rendering, HDR, face recognition, and speed increases. These enhancements and others are diverse enough that most people will be really excited for some new features, and care little for others (although we all love more speed). Given that I am best known in some circles for inventing and popularizing a panorama technique, it’s not hard to guess that I was most keenly interested in the panorama features. But the devil is in the details, and after a few weeks I found myself using Lightroom in ways I hadn’t imagined.

The “YESSSSSSS”: Better speed

Speed has been the biggest complaint I hear among Lightroom users, and while whether Lightroom CC is “fast” depends on your system and subjective opinion, it is noticeably faster. In Lightroom 5 I usually would change my iMac 5K resolution to 25 percent of its full capability, just to keep things snappy. I’ve never felt the need to do that in Lightroom CC. I haven’t run numbers, but in practice it took away my biggest frustration with an otherwise great program.

Panoramas: Not quite there yet

Storyboard002Autopano Giga on the left, beta of Lightroom CC on the right

Disclaimer: I have been testing beta software. The final version should be better at everything.

Seven years ago, I popularized a panorama technique that has come to be known as “The Brenizer method.” But before it caught on to the extent it has today, I almost stopped doing it completely.

Why? Because working with the software at the time was extremely annoying. You see, Brenizer method images are often produced with 50 or more images, and the stitching software at the time struggled to keep up. Photoshop CS could produce beautiful results, but it would seemingly freeze up two-thirds into a panorama for 15 or 20 minutes at a time, and you had to leave, go watch some TV, and hope. This is painful enough with one panorama, but if you shot five to 10 panoramas per job processing them could take all day. Things got a bit better until by CS3 they were working pretty well … and then CS4 came out. They had solved the progress bar issue, but for this particular type of panorama, the success rate dropped precipitously, and there were no easy fixes. I turned to third-party software partially for better results but, even more importantly, because you can set up a batch of panoramas and leave your computer to work them all out in peace.

Sadly, even though Lightroom is the general class leader in “setting up a bunch of batch processes and walking away while your CPU spins at 400 percent for a while,” there still is no way to batch process panoramas. And unless you are a careful, tripod-using sort of pano shooter, the results are … less than stellar.

Lightroom is and has been my choice for processing panorama pieces for a long time. The “match total exposure” feature is particularly valuable for any times where you couldn’t perfectly pre-set all of your parameters. The photos above were originally four shots taken on an iPhone 6 Plus, each at a slightly different exposure — which doesn’t make for a great pano. But Lightroom not only is able to do lens corrections on the iPhone camera, it can automatically adjust the exposure variation if you know how to find the surprisingly secretive menu item.

Four images, no major wind — it wasn’t the hardest panorama to stitch, even though there was no tripod. But Lightroom didn’t do too well at it, and there was no easy way to fix it. When I tried the same pano with Autopano Giga, it didn’t break a sweat.

Promising: HDR

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HDR fans will be glad to hear that the HDR function works better in my testing, and HDR haters will be glad to hear that it works well at producing HDR photos that don’t look extremely “HDR-y”. The result pops back into the Lightroom catalog as a fully adjustable DNG file, with no inherent way to turn the tone-mapping dial up to 11. It just allows you to create a RAW file that has more bits and dynamic range than you could have made in a single shot, and then process to your choice from there. I haven’t shot much HDR over the years, but the speed, ease, and natural results of this means that I may try a bit more here and there.

Surprisingly great: Face recognition

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There are some industries where face recognition can be extremely helpful, but wedding photography isn’t generally one of them. The best potential application is answering the question “Do you have any more photos of …” but the trade-off is that creating a library of fans even for a single wedding shoot can take hours. But Lightroom’s face recognition is so great that I have made it the primary way of collecting my personal photos, even though I am a devout “new catalog for every shoot” guy who has always used other programs for this purpose.

Screenshot 2015 04 21 09 55 00But face recognition becomes extremely handy when you are dealing with a giant collection of photos of people you really care about. Just the main folder of my friends and family photos has nearly 30,000 finished photos, more than enough to become unwieldy. But when a friend asked me two days ago whether I had a particular photo of her, Lightroom was able to find it in a few seconds.

Now, by “surprisingly great” I don’t mean that the actual face recognition algorithms are any better than Apple’s or Google’s — they all work in a way that seems fundamentally like magic, but they can all also be thrown off in amusing ways, such as Lightroom thinking that the faces of 20 or so of my friends live in this Christmas wrapping paper.

No, what’s great about Lightroom’s face-recognition is the implementation. Labeling the faces in 30,000 photos individually sounds like actual torture. It’s really important for programs to have very well-worked out systems for batching as many photos correctly as possible, and Lightroom does that much better than Apple’s new Photos app.

In the Faces section you will see the confirmed faces of any individuals you have named — and these names seem to only exist on a per-catalog basis. You can drag or drop either individual images or “stacks” that Adobe has automatically created, throwing more photos on the “Ryan” pile, for example. And you can also double-click on any confirmed individual and it will start looking through whichever folders you have selected for photos that look like it might be the same person.

This allows for a very efficient batch-labelling process. For example:

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Looking for photos of my father shows that I have already found every photo that looks like him in the selected folder. But I also see a photo of my great-uncle Victor, who I haven’t created a folder for yet. Typing his name in will add him to the list of confirmed people.

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With just one or two images Lightroom already has a good enough idea of what he looks like to find more photos. I can shift-click on the images below to select them all, and with one drag not only will I have more photos labelled correctly, but Lightroom will automatically and quickly use them to get a better sense of what he looks like, and find even more photos. Lightroom will start with its best guesses, and then guess more and more wildly. Given all this, you can very quickly fill out someone’s labelling folder by starting with even just one photo of them, and selecting the photos that appear before Lightroom starts guessing wrong, even if those aren’t all of the photos you see. With this process, the guesses will quickly just get better and better.

I’ve used iPhoto, Photos, and Picasa, and Lightroom’s implementation is the quickest and most intuitive. This alone has taken me from ignoring the cataloging features to being my primary way of collecting photos of my friends and family.

There are so many things to discover in Lightroom CC. I encourage you to try it out and see which ways you’ll be surprised.

One light, many jobs

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It’s been one of those months that give lie to the phrase “off-season.” We are back from Dubai and finally over our jet lag, preparing for weddings and so much exciting stuff coming in April I can’t even stare at my calendar directly.

Here’s a shot from one of my workshops at Gulf Photo Plus in Dubai. The amazing staff there worked so hard for me … maybe too hard! I primarily teach how to get good results in any kind of environment, and they wrangled up a bunch of five-star hotels like The Sofitel Jumeirah Beach, but we found a way to make it difficult. Here, one light is doing triple duty — backlight on the couple, freezing the water drops in the shower, and providing the nicely formed silhouette. Best of all, no one got wet! Ok, I got a little wet.

Nikon D750, 28mm f/1.8 @f/3.5, 1/200th, ISO 100.


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I’ve made a lot of changes you cannot see, but it radiates through everything that I do. People ask me “What are your goals for the new year?” But in 2015 and beyond I am trying to tear down my goals and focus on the purpose behind them. I’ve always known the purpose I have for the work I do for my clients — it is so obvious every time I share and document tears of joy, years of relationships balled up into a single shining, gemlike moment.

But why do I share? Why do I teach? Why do we photographers spend so much time talking to other photographers? To get likes? To go viral? To be a virus? If virality mattered we’d have spent the entire last year talking about our new corporate masters, Dollar Shave Club.

I share and show so that I can see as many of these wonderful moments as I can, but also so I can take part in the conversation, so I can say “Give me a spare corner of a golf course, a couple in love, and the ability to find my angle, and this is what I will do.” And it is not what you may have seen, and so I leave something behind … a moment, a way of seeing, a piece of the conversation that I love being a part of.

That is my purpose. It is not the fire that burns but the foundation we build every day we care about what we do.

Camera: Nikon D810
Lens: Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 II

Kimmel Center Wedding: Dana and Zal

Speaking as a groom about to plan his own wedding: Zal, you’re making it harder for the rest of us. First, the proposal: Both Dana and Zal are actors, knowing that Dana’s favorite movie was “Pretty Woman,” he faked an audition for her to go try out — but when she got there, all she found was that she had been put in the right place for Zal to come up, sticking out a limo a la Richard Gere. I knew right from this description that they were going to have a heck of a wedding, but this is only the beginning. Zal had been a member of the Broadway Boys performance group, and Dana knew that he had convinced them to perform at the reception … but not that he was rehearsed and ready to perform a few song with them. At every moment this sense of whimsy and delight at marrying Dana was written in exclamation points on his face, and in every aspect of planning. I got more involved in the planning of the day than usual, helping not just with the schedule and some of the other vendor recommendations (such as our pal Paul Hairston on video) but also things like lighting design, and loved it because both of their excitement even carried through the logistics.

It doesn’t hurt that Philadelphia’s Kimmel Center is a beautiful, dramatic place to hold a wedding. It’s also big. Really big. We were wearing fitness bands that day, and I’m glad, since both Tatiana Breslow and I hit all-time records. We’d love to shoot there again for that cardiovascular fitness, if not for the beauty.


Iberostar Playa Mita Mexico wedding teaser

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Last week Tatiana and I went down to Mexico to shoot with the all-around fantastic Tyler Wirken. It was a hilarious, wonderful heart-warming affair … and also body-warming. Did we mention Mexico is wonderful this time of year? If we tried this shot in New York right now we’d get a bunch of interesting documentation from the hospital later. More to come…

This was shot hand-held. It was … not easy.

Nikon D810, 12-24mm @ 12mm, f/14, 1/2 second, ISO 320

Onteora Mountain House wedding: Crista and Robert

I’m not going to spend too much time here, because each word I write comes between you and the photos of this fantastic wedding for a few hundredths of a second. But a lot of people ask my advice for how to have a good wedding, and my advice is the same for a good relationship: If you’re having fun, most of the other stuff falls into place. This doesn’t mean that planning isn’t important — it’s not really so much fun to have a wedding in a field during a thunderstorm because you didn’t have a good plan — but it’s too easy to forget that having fun together comes first.

So yes, it’s pretty great that Crista and Robert chose the beautiful Onteora Mountain House for their wedding, and that the weather — while chilly — allowed everyone to enjoy the mountain views. It doesn’t hurt that Crista and Robert are basically action heroes, with Robert trained in every sort of theatrical movement and Crista … well, none of Crista’s bridesmaids even batted an eye when she started walking around on her hands. But what matters is how much fun everyone had together, how deep and boisterous and joyful the connections, from streaming tears to bendy backs on the dance floor. And it’s what we all remember.

Just as importantly, I remember how much fun I had in my own partnership, shooting this with the incredible Tatiana Breslow. I will never get over the fact that the woman I fell so deeply in love with happens to also be my favorite shooting partner out of everyone I’ve worked with, that our eyes and our choices are so in sync. We are going to be merging not only our lives but also our businesses, and I am so excited for this future on every level, and to show the world what we can do together. It’s going to be fun.

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