Worth the wait

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This image was a composite AND a panorama, but that wasn’t what made it so hard. No, it was the Universal Law of Shooting in NYC: When you have scouted a location, and the whole time you scouted there were no people there, and you really need no people to be there, right as you’re ready to shoot a hundred schoolchildren will flood the scene.

Camera: Nikon D4
Lens: 8-image “Brenizer method” panorama with the Nikon 85mm f/1.4G (equivalent of 42mm f/0.68 according to Brett’s calculator)

Foundry Wedding: Annie and Bill

I love a good party, and it seems like weddings at The Foundry are always fantastic parties. There must be some sort of neural connection between the preferences that make people love the dark brick and ironwork of the space and of a propensity to do the chicken wing on the dance floor. I don’t have to tell you that Annie and Bill were extremely fun; you’ll see that below. But they were also laid-back in a way that we forget New Yorkers can be, focused on just a great time with each other and their loved ones. In fact, family was so close that Bill’s sister served as Best Woman, complete with a tux just for the ceremony. Whether it was searching for the right-fitting female tux, a giant pile of cheese instead of wedding cake, or the beautiful hanging lights, they made sure that this day was their own, and I was happy to record it. Thanks to the fantastic Dave Paek for doing another great job as assistant.

The Red Balloon

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I’ve never actually worked with a big heart balloon on an engagement session before … seems a SoCal staple … so when Florencia and Jay brought one I figured we’d put a twist on it.

Camera: Nikon D4
Lens: Nikon 135mm f/2 D DC

Stage 6 at Steiner Studios Wedding: Anna and Steven

We’ve been having some pretty terrible weather in New York this year, but the grey, cold skies opened up for Anna and Steven’s wedding at Steiner Studios, giving us some time to traipse about Brooklyn. I love doing Russian weddings, even though it always reminds me how rusty my Russian has gotten since college (these days I am pretty much limited to being able to ask where the post office is.) There is so much focus on family, and it is always a great party, especially when Anna and Steven’s friends give a surprise (and surprisingly great) Russian pop performance at the reception. Thanks to Dave Paek for assisting!

Tappan Hill Wedding: Stephanie and Scott

Great friends, great food, laughter that wracks through your whole body, work friends showing surprisingly awesome dance moves, cheeky grandparents, two kind and soulful binding their friendship and partnership … and SNOW! I love this job, I love Tappan Hill, and I love these people. And thanks to Kacy Jahanbini for fantastic assistance.

Quick hits from the weekend

I’m in the air over Iowa now on the way to WPPI, where I will close out the party with a lecture on what to do when you’re shooting a wedding and everything seems to be working against you (otherwise called “most weddings ever.”) What better way to get ready for it than shooting two weddings? So much more to come; here’s a quick fix:

Green Building Wedding: Jenna and Aaron

I’m pretty sure this is the soonest after a wedding that I’ve ever blogged the images — chalk it up to a pre-WPPI convention burst of productivity. But also these make me excited for a number of reasons. First, Jenna and Aaron are awesome, hilarious, and brilliant. I really love how frequently the best man and maid of honor speeches mention how freaking smart my couples are, since if smart people hire you, maybe you’re doing something right. Aaron, after all, if the sort of fellow who had Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, a thoroughly impenetrable book, out as pleasure reading. Sadly there were more important things going on than for us to sit and share a dialectical chat.

But also this was my first wedding since being named of the top 10 wedding photographers in the world by American Photo magazine, and my first wedding since the Foundation Workshops. Contrary to what you might think, the former fact never entered my mind all day. But Foundation loomed large in my mind — I have spent my entire career working as hard as I can to show lasting moments, people’s personalities and how amazing they look at their wedding day, but the intensity of the Foundation Workshop made me work harder than ever at being a perfectionist along the way — stressing over every millimieter of what is and is not included in each frame. Of course, sometimes the moment is strong enough that you just go for it — the ring bearer kissing his brother was impossible to frame perfectly, but even just mentioning the existence of the photo made their mother break out in a huge grin.

Also, though for a mix of modesty and SEO purposes she doesn’t want me to mention her name, I was joined by the amazing T, and she KILLED it. Lots of great photos, and even when running the photobooth she managed to take a simple setup and create art! I’ve never been so tempted to put photobooth images in a blog post. Thanks, T!

I’m so excited for 2013, and this was a great way to kick off the main season!

Bayard’s Wedding: Sarah and Alex

Sara and Alex’s wedding at Bayard’s was all about family … really. They struggled with changed dates and planning to make sure that Sarah’s parents could be there from the Philippines, and even just weeks before they still weren’t sure that they could make it. Thankfully they made it for a beautiful-but-freezing winter wedding. St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral is a gorgeous place for a ceremony — and apparently completely unheated. But whether in the church or on an icy Wall Street walk, there was little but ecstasy in Sarah and Alex’s minds, and it was infectious despite a few blue fingers.

Come With Me

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I’m in Europe, where I’ve just got done teaching two London workshops and am currently taking two days in Paris. It was an absolute blast with fantastic attendees, and a fair share of beer and foosball (or “table football,” as it is called here.) But some of the things I stressed were pushing yourself into places you don’t usually go, and working with clients for creative results, so I thought “well, let’s actually practice what I’m preaching.”

As part of the trip, I was reunited with Claudia, a great model who moved off to Germany after getting married, but in the process she never had any wedding photos of her own! So we arranged a bridal session. The problem before me was this: I knew we could get gorgeous photos. She’s gorgeous. I could put her in decent window light and take a snap with my iPhone and it would be gorgeous. And if I’d been doing a couples’s shoot I knew I could find the uniqueness in their relationship. But her husband couldn’t make it from Germany, so how do you shoot a bridal model’s bridal photos without it looking like just another bridal modeling session she’s done? We’re celebrating the real thing here.

I reached back to an idea I’ve had for many years, and I realized this would be the perfect time to put it in practice. And, more importantly, it was fun. Belt Craft Studios was a perfect place for this, with all sorts of props that we re-appropriated, but also a bunch of stuff that we simply stole from our apartment. This was one of the tableaus we created. Thanks to Tatiana Breslow for assisting, and to Claudia for being an amazing bride, and really working her core strength for these.

Camera: Nikon D4
Lens: Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6